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Rodman Street Missionary Baptist Church, Pittsburgh – Mission:
Making contact to make an impact by building a Community of Hope through loving relationships that model Christ and affirm His lordship in our daily lives.

Rodman Street Missionary Baptist Church, Pittsburgh – Origin:
Founder Jeremiah Fitzgerald, a native of Danville, Virginia, arrived in the city of Pittsburgh in 1880.

A devout Baptist, Fitzgerald was surprised to find only three people of his religious belief within the confines of the East Liberty section of the city. Those three people were Wilmore Johnson, Alexander Barbour and William Dangerfield.

For approximately three months, Mr. Fitzgerald attended the St. James A.M.E. Church, never losing his desire to reunite with his beloved faith. He began to attend Antioch Baptist Church, becoming acquainted and beginning a strong friendship with Mrs. Melvina Dent.

From this amicable relationship, a small group, holding spirit-filled prayer services, began to gather at the home of this beloved Christian woman. Located at the corner of Sheridan and Bethel Place, these prayer services began the growth and unfolding of stirring historical events within East Liberty’s Baptist community.

During one of the Spirit-filled meetings, police arrived, breaking up the meeting and arresting Jeremiah Fitzgerald. Charged with disturbing the peace of the neighborhood, the humiliation forced the group to move their meetings to the home of Mrs. Thomas Ransome.

Determined, the small Baptist group began the bold, courageous process of organizing a church in which they could freely practice the faith burning in their hearts. The staunch assembly, meeting on a Friday night in May 1885, consisted of members Jeremiah Fitzgerald, Thomas and Annie Ransome, Wilmore Johnson, Alexander Barbour, William Dangerfield, Samuel Loveless and Amanda Holmes.

On the first Sunday in May, 1885, the Salome Baptist Church opened its doors in the 6400 block of Penn Avenue. Rev. Willis Duvall of the North Side of Pittsburgh was called to pastor the newly-formed church, serving approximately 3 ½ years. During his service to the church, a split occurred, causing a reorganization.

Serving approximately 3 ½ years of dedicated service through 1892, Rev. Duvall’s vacancy paved the way for Rev. R. S. Gibson of Charlottesville, Virginia. Rev. Gibson’s service was also short, serving only three years before accepting a call to Plainfield, New Jersey. For the next three months, the pulpit of Salome Baptist Church was vacant.

Later that same year, Rev. O. S. Simms arrived from Halifax, Virginia, to serve the Salome Baptist Church.

Within one year of accepting the leadership, the aggressive visionary moved the congregation from an old leased hall to a newly erected frame building that is located on the site of the present church site.

A name change occurred, and the 900 seating capacity church was now known as Rodman Street Baptist Church.

But it was not long before the congregation outgrew the capacity of the church, making it necessary for the erection of a larger church.

The present building was erected with a seating capacity of 2,200. Since the completion of the worship facility, more than 3,000 persons were added to the church rolls…with nearly 2,000 members claiming baptism by Rev. Simms.

Metropolitan Baptist Church, Largo – Origin:
In 1864, a year after President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation freeing slaves in these United States, wards where black people resided in the District of Columbia continued to have disparaging labels, i.e., “Hell’s Bottom,” “Cow Town,” and “Vinegar Hill,” to name a few.

It was in the “Hell’s Bottom” ward that the Reverend Henry Bailey and ten like-minded Christian believers began worshipping in an abandoned Civil War barracks.

Later, they pooled their resources, purchased a frame house, renovated it, and established it as the Fourth Baptist Church of the District of Columbia, valued at $2500.00. Among those ten believers was a Mr. Wiley Jordan, grandfather of Mrs. Moncerie Woolfolk.

Metropolitan Baptist Church, Largo – Mission:
To bring persons into a saving and redemptive relationship as disciples of Jesus Christ

Metropolitan Baptist Church, Largo – Kingdom Principles:
Love
Servant Leadership
Humanity
Family
Worship and Praise
Personal Development
Kingdom Consciousness

Alfred Street Baptist Church, Alexandria – Origin:
Alfred Street Baptist Church, Alexandria traces its origins to 1803, during the period when Thomas Jefferson served as the third president of the United States.

At that time, Baptists in Northern Virginia worshipped at the Backlick Baptist Church on Little River Turnpike.

However, in April 1803, members from Alexandria, Virginia separated from them to form the Alexandria Baptist Society.

Susan Black, a Negro slave was baptized as its first colored member in May 1803, and soon other coloreds were invited to join this integrated group.

In 1806, the colored members formally established the Colored Baptist Society of Alexandria as a ‘conjoined’ church with the Alexandria Baptist Society. This created the first African American Baptist church north of Richmond, Virginia.

In 1815, its numbers grew when slaves from Mount Vernon Plantation joined the Colored Baptist Society.

During 1818, members of the Colored Baptist Society were able to rent property at 313 South Alfred Street to hold their meetings.

After 18 years of renting, they purchased the site in September 1842.

Rev. William Evans served as the early leader (1806-1859) of the Colored Baptist Society, during which time they continued as a conjoined body with the white Alexandria Baptist Society.

In 1850, the Colored Baptist Society, now known as the African Baptist Society, was granted complete independence from the ‘conjoined’ body and adopted the Alexandria Baptist Church’s constitution. Membership of the newly independent colored assembly stood at 83 persons.

By 1855, membership had grown to 200 members as the group constructed the first known building and changed its name to the First African Baptist Church. The Church paid off the mortgage on the new building in two years.

Rev. William Evans served as the early leader (1806-1859) of the Colored Baptist Society, during which time they continued as a conjoined body with the white Alexandria Baptist Society.

In 1850, the Colored Baptist Society, now known as the African Baptist Society, was granted complete independence from the ‘conjoined’ body and adopted the Alexandria Baptist Church’s constitution. Membership of the newly independent colored assembly stood at 83 persons.

By 1855, membership had grown to 200 members as the group constructed the first known building and changed its name to the First African Baptist Church. The Church paid off the mortgage on the new building in two years.

Kensington Temple, London – Origin:
One hundred and fifty years ago a group of men and women, members of Kensington’s Congregational church in Hornton Street, began to pray for the “poor and neglected people of Notting Hill Vale”, according to the church secretary’s minute-book.

Dr Kenneth Taylor, of Living Bible fame, on a visit to London was asked, “What part of London would you expect Jesus to visit first if He were to return to Britain today?” “Notting Hill Gate,” he replied.

“Why?” asked the interviewer. “ Well, that’s where all the world seems to meet. I’ve never seen so many different classes or nationalities in one area in all my world travels”.

But Notting Hill was not forgotten by the “members of Kensington’s Hornton Street Congregational church” who, according to one newspaper report of that time, “had been deeply moved at a recent prayer meeting and many had wept as they commissioned thirty-seven people who were to pioneer the new work in Notting Hill”. In the notes made by these pioneering Christian men of Hornton Street we read that they, with typical English reserve, wrote that “additional religious accommodation was desirable” in Notting Hill. But they not only prayed, they put their hands in their pockets. One individual gave £1,000. That was followed by £700 from the congregation.

With this money they proceeded to buy a plot of ground on the corner site of the two roads we now call Ladbroke Grove and Kensington park Road. It cost £630 (probably worth millions of pounds today). On 30 august 1848 a foundation stone was laid, and a year later the completed building named Horbury Chapel was opened. It was so named after the village of Horbury in Yorkshire, birthplace of the Congregational Church’s first church treasurer.

New Life Assembly of God (NLAG) Church, Chennai – Origin:

In November 2013 NLAG Church celebrated its 40th year as the new life family.

New Life Assembly of God (NLAG) Church, Chennai had its humble beginning in a small rented house with 7 members in the year 1973. It began growing through the consistent preaching of God’s Word, prevailing prayer and faith despite many trials that came in the form of cyclones, fires and floods, destroying the meeting places. Each time however, the congregation continued meeting under the shade of trees till God provided a building in 1986 at Little Mount. Around 50 prayer cells had formed across the city, steadily growing the Church to over 2000 people by 1993.

With the introduction of the cell based model of discipleship, New Life Assembly of God (NLAG) Church, Chennai continued to grow as a network of small group communities that met in homes during the week and gathered together on weekends.

The building was extended in 1994 to accommodate the growth and multiple services were conducted though the weekend. With the understanding of the priesthood of all believers, the members of each home cell were discipled, equipped and released into action, causing the growth of New Life Assembly of God (NLAG) Church, Chennai to over 35,000 people today.

In 2011 New Life Assembly of God (NLAG) Church, Chennai hosted the World AG Conference in Chennai. The entire New Life Assembly of God (NLAG) Church, Chennai came together to serve the many Assembly of God Church representatives who gathered at New Life Assembly of God (NLAG) Church, Chennai from 74 different nations.

Rev. D. Mohan, the founder and Senior Pastor, along with a host of pastors, elders and gifted administrators have been continuously establishing the Church in the faith, the wholistic teaching of God’s word, discipleship, relentless prayer and worship, equipping people to impact the city, nation and the world with the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

  • : India
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    Sundays: Tamil: 5:00 AM IST (Sat 11:30 PM GMT) 7:00 AM IST (1:30 AM GMT) 8:45 AM IST (3:15 AM GMT) 10:30 AM IST (5:00 AM GMT) 12:15 PM IST (6:45 AM GMT) 6:00 PM IST (12:30 PM GMT) English: 6:30 AM IST (1:00 AM GMT) 8:15 PM IST (2:45 AM GMT) 10:00 AM IST (4:30 PM GMT) 11:45 AM IST (6:15 AM GMT) 4:30 PM IST (11:00 AM GMT)
  • : http://nlag.in/mediatamil
  • : Assemblies of God
  • : http://nlag.in/who-we-are#core-beliefs
  • : http://nlag.in/